vacation home

How to Protect the Legacy of Your Vacation Home

vacation home

For generations, the children in your family have learned to swim by jumping off of the dock of your family’s vacation home. It’s a rite of passage for each grandchild to learn how to bait a hook from grandpa while fireflies flicker in the summer heat. The legacy of a vacation home is the pinnacle of the American Dream. Many people work their entire lives to afford a home in their dream destination. While you dream of passing down this home (and the memories) for generations to come, have you thought of how to protect this family legacy?

Leaving the family vacation home directly to your children may be the simplest way for transferring ownership, however, when multiple children are involved, they would all need to agree with how the property is managed and maintained in the future. These decisions are proven to be challenging not only for your children to agree on, but also their future spouses.

An LLC is often used by families, in which each family member would have a certain membership interest in the home or to give away in a controlled manner. If the home is rented at certain times of the year, the LLC can help limit the liability of the family and profits could be used to help maintain the property.

Trusts are another tool used to protect a family home. This legal agreement allows you to specify how you would like the property to be managed once you die. You can use the trust to identify who will own your vacation home, when they will have access to it, and what they will be allowed to do with the property.

One of the many benefits of placing your vacation home in a trust is to avoid probate. When you pass away, assets that legally belong to a trust will be passed on to your beneficiaries without going through probate. There are several trust options available to align with your specific needs. I few most common trusts are:

IRREVOCABLE TRUST

The house can be placed into an irrevocable trust with your children named as beneficiaries. The terms of the trust would outline the management and use of the home. An irrevocable trust helps to protect the family from possible creditor liens.

REVOCABLE TRUST

A revocable trust can be used to transfer the property to family members at the time of your death. This option can set up what is called a subtrust to manage your vacation home after your death. There is usually a set amount of money set aside in the trust to help care for the property for a period of time.

QUALIFIED PERSONAL RESIDENCE TRUST

This allows you to gift the property at a reduced value, while allowing yourself to use the property for a set amount of years, after that time has expired the home can transfer directly to family or to a trust for future generations.

Contact a New York Estate Planning Attorney

Preserving your family’s legacy of summers full of fun is important to avoid future family conflicts and avoiding litigation. Choosing the right financial structure for your family to enjoy and use the property will help guarantee family fun for future generations. An experienced estate planning attorney can help you to assess your unique needs and goals. Contact Amoruso & Amoruso, LLP for a personal meeting.

home aging

Aging in Place vs. Nursing Home Care: Important Factors to Make the Right Choice

home aging

A growing portion of the older population wants to stay in their homes as long as possible. This is known as “aging in place” and has several benefits when it is appropriate for the individual. However, there are some other care concerns to consider when deciding whether someone is at the point of needing additional help.

COMFORT AND FAMILIARITY

Most people want to remain in their homes because of the comfort, familiarity, and memories within it. Moving into assisted living or a nursing home is a big change for anyone, but especially for a senior who feels the loss of their independence during this transition. Remember that, when it is safe for them to stay there, someone’s home can support their overall mental and physical health.

If staying in the same place is important to your loved one, look for ways to ease your mind while also protecting their independence. Is there a neighbor or friend who can check on them each week? Can you drop in every other weekend to make sure things are going well?

SAFETY CONCERNS

Many adult children or other loved ones start thinking about these issues because they’re concerned over safety. Triggering events prompting a conversation about additional care needs include a loved one beginning to show signs of dementia or suffering one or more physical incidents like a fall in their home.

YOUR TIME AND PROXIMITY

As a family member, it’s natural to want to do everything you can to care for a loved one. Caregiving, however, can be very difficult and time consuming. It can be even more challenging if you don’t live nearby. If your time and that of other family members can no longer support a loved one, a nursing home or assisted living may be the answer.

FINANCES

Whether or not your loved one owns their home is the first consideration. Ongoing mortgage payments are just part of the puzzle. It can be hard for people to part with their home, but maintenance concerns and costs can be problematic. Evaluate the age of appliances and yard maintenance required, too. At some point a home might be more trouble than it’s worth to the occupant.

MEDICAL SUPPORT NEEDED

If a loved one only needs help with light housekeeping or meal preparation, they may not need to move to another location, especially a nursing home. Local organizations or a part-time hire could help with these needs while allowing your loved one to stay in their home.

However, if they have more advanced medical needs or challenges with multiple activities of daily living, in-home care from a medical professional could bridge the gap. For more advanced situations, a nursing home might be appropriate.

There are other care options along the spectrum in between care services provided by family and a nursing home. Part-time help from someone local such as a nurse, in-home care providers, assisted living, and adult day care are just a few. For someone who needs extra support but does not require the support of a formal nursing home, these options are well worth exploring.

Contact a New York Elder Law Attorney

An experienced elder law attorney can help you to assess your unique needs and goals. Contact Amoruso & Amoruso, LLP for a personal meeting.

estate planning

When Was the Last Time You Updated Your Estate Plan?

estate planning

For many, an estate plan is created and never looked over again – until it’s necessary to do so. But did you know that you should really look at your estate plan as something that grows and changes with you?

Think about what has happened in your life since the last time you looked over your estate plan. Maybe you bought a new home, got married, or welcomed your second child. Each of these events demonstrates exactly why keeping your plan up to date is just as important as creating a well-designed plan in the first place – because life is full of beautiful changes.

And life will continue to offer these changes, especially as you grow older. Your health, financial situation, income, and the overall value of your assets continuously change with you and over time. Plus, the needs of your loved ones will change over time as well. After all, people get divorced, remarry, have children, buy and sell homes, start a business, change jobs, and sometimes they suffer unforeseen financial difficulties like bankruptcy or personal problems like alcoholism.

By having an established schedule to review, and, if necessary, revise your estate plan on a regular basis you’ll be able to account for every change life brings your way, and better protect both you and your loved ones in the process. But, if you believe any recent life events may have impacted your estate plan’s effectiveness, we urge you to have your plan reviewed immediately.

On top of that, the law is constantly changing. Over the years, new laws may take effect and others may be repealed which could make some options for protecting assets less attractive than they were previously or offer new opportunities for wealth preservation and growth. Working with a knowledgeable estate planning attorney as you update your estate plan will ensure you have a strategy in place that will take advantage of every legislative update.

So, whether or not you and your loved ones have experienced any recent life changes, it’s best to have your plan reviewed at least every two years to make sure your existing strategy takes into account any changes to the law, tax code, or financial landscape. It’s a great feeling to know you have thoughtfully prepared for your and your loved ones’ future financial, physical, and emotional well-being with your estate plan. Now, it’s simply a matter of keeping your plan up to date so that the same level of carefully considered protection lasts for years to come.

Senior woman dealing with a medicaid crisis

The Rising Costs of Medicaid and Managing a Medicaid Crisis

 

Senior woman dealing with a medicaid crisis

Did you know that in the United States, the median monthly cost of a semi-private room in a nursing home is currently more than $7,900? And the cost of a private room exceeds $9,000 per month! Plus, depending on where you live, costs can even be considerably higher.

Making matters worse, costs rise according to the level of care needed and they are expected to continue increasing dramatically in the future. (You can see the current costs for home care, adult day care, assisted living, and nursing home care in your area by visiting https://www.genworth.com/aging-and-you/finances/cost-of-care.html.)

Despite the exorbitant costs of long-term care, nearly 70 percent of those over the age of 65 will require long-term care at some point in their lives, and 20 percent will need long-term care for five years or more. Given this, it’s easy to see why many families exhaust their life savings within a few years of a family member entering a nursing home, and why more than half of all nursing home stays are now funded by Medicaid.

But planning for your loved one’s future care isn’t always easy. If they have already moved into a nursing home, or must enter one in the very near future, and you have been informed that they own too many assets to qualify for assistance from Medicaid then your family is in a Medicaid Crisis situation.

Such a situation is indeed a financial crisis for all but the wealthiest families. If you or a loved one is facing a Medicaid Crisis, try to remain calm. Much of the information we hear about Medicaid from friends, relatives, nursing home staff, caregivers, and many others is outdated or incorrect.

There is hope! A qualified elder law attorney can help you by assessing your unique case, strategizing the options that are best for you and your family, and obtaining assistance from Medicaid. It is possible to get Medicaid assistance even if you are already in a nursing home or will need to enter one next month, next week, or even tomorrow. Even if you have applied for Medicaid assistance in the past but were rejected, it is entirely possible that a qualified elder law attorney can still obtain the financial assistance you need.

Contact a New York Elder Law Attorney

You’ve worked too hard to lose your life savings to the nursing home. Let an experienced elder law attorney help you secure the financial assistance you need and deserve. Contact us today for a consultation to discuss your plan.

estate planning

A Will is a Key Component of Any Estate Planning, But It’s Not Enough

estate planning

When most people think of estate planning, usually writing out their will comes to mind. While a will can help you accomplish a number of important planning goals, it’s certainly not a complete plan to protect your future.

Many people know that a will allows you to control how your assets are distributed after you pass away. And, that without a will, your assets would simply be distributed in an action carried out by the state. Known as intestate succession, the state acts in an objective, and simply procedural, manner because your assets are required to be distributed. The process of intestate succession will completely ignore your wishes because what you “would have wanted” is simply irrelevant to the state without a formal will in place.

A will is also critical when you have minor children. The terms of your will can give you control over how your minor children are raised should you and your spouse pass away. In your will, you can name a trusted person to serve as a guardian, someone who will raise and care for your children when you cannot. However, without a will, a court decides who will raise your children; a decision that may appoint a person you never would have selected yourself.

In sum, yes, a will is an important document to create so you can rest assured your wishes will be respected after you’ve passed away. Yet, it’s important to consider the limitations of a will as well. For instance, your will does not allow you to manage your affairs should you become incapacitated.

Working with an experienced estate planning attorney to establish a durable power of attorney and advanced medical directive will ensure that you retain some control over what is done on your behalf if you become incapacitated. Each of these documents empowers one or more individuals to make decisions about your assets or medical care when you are unable. If you do not have either document in place, a court will decide who to appoint to fill these roles for you. Again, leaving the decision open for the court to decide could lead to the appointment of someone you would not have chosen for yourself; someone who would then have the power to take actions they believe are in your best interest regardless of your personal preferences.

Further, many financial accounts require a beneficiary designation, instead of a will, to determine how the assets will be distributed. Ownership of assets such as life insurance, annuities, retirement accounts like IRAs and 401(k)s, and jointly-owned property all look to the beneficiary designation form for guidance on how the asset is to be distributed after the owner’s passing. In fact, many IRS rulings and court cases have concluded that the owner’s statements and intent in his or her will do not matter if they contradict what was written on the beneficiary designation form. This is why it’s important to also review your beneficiary designations periodically to ensure they reflect your wishes now, and not what you wanted when, for example, you opened the IRA 20 years ago.

A trust is another estate planning tool families can utilize to provide a greater level of flexibility in how their future is managed. For example, a revocable living trust allows your estate to avoid probate entirely—and the public scrutiny that accompanies it. Trusts can also protect your assets against creditors and other threats while protecting your heirs’ inheritances against creditors, predators, remarriage, and even their own poor decisions if they are not yet mature enough to handle an inheritance on their own.

Contact a New York Estate Planning Attorney

In short, while a will can help you accomplish important goals, additional estate planning tools and strategies are available to protect you and your loved ones both after you pass away and in the event of tragedy while you are still alive. An experienced estate planning attorney can help you determine the best tools and strategy for you.

Screen Shot 2022-10-25 at 12.21.20 PM

Choosing a Trustee for Your Special Needs Trust

special needs trustee

Choosing the right trustee for any trust is a difficult and extremely important decision. In the case of choosing the right trustee for the trust you have created to protect your loved one with special needs, the decision is even more important—particularly if your loved one is a young child. Let’s take a look at some of the options and discuss the pros and cons of each.

Your Parents

Many couples consider this first. After all, your parents know and love your children, and understand your wishes. However, this is only a temporary solution, as your special needs trust must protect your loved one with special needs for his or her entire lifetime.

Your Siblings

Like your parents, this may be a good temporary solution. But the same drawback applies here as well. Your siblings are unlikely to outlast the trust itself, and you will need a successor trustee.

Your Other Children

This option seems logical to many couples because their children know one another well and are roughly the same age. However, you must consider a number of factors with this option. First, the role of trustee is a difficult one, fraught with potential liability. Do your other children have the time and capacity to serve as trustee? Then you need to consider the dynamics of your family. Should all of your children be named as co-trustees, or should only one of them be named as sole trustee, and how will this impact the relationship between family members. That is, will you be perceived as “playing favorites?”

A Bank or Trust Company

Most banks, brokerage houses and trust companies will only accept large trusts, ranging from a minimum of $300,000 to more than $1,000,000. Many will not accept special needs trusts at all. However, if you have a special needs trust that meets the institution’s minimum requirements, and the institution’s trust department has an outstanding reputation, this may be a long-term option worth considering.

As you can see, there are a variety of options, each of which has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes, the best choice is a combination of one or more options. We are here to guide you through the various options and help you choose the trustee, or combination of temporary trustee and successor trustee, best suited to your particular situation and needs.

married, marrying

Estate Planning for Couples Marrying Later in Life

married, marrying

Here are some factors to consider when marrying, or remarrying, later in life.

Should You Have a Prenuptial Agreement?

In most situations, the answer is yes, particularly if you and your betrothed have children from previous marriages, a disparity in financial resources, or substantial assets. When couples marry, assets and income typically become community property. A prenuptial agreement makes provisions for dividing assets if the marriage ends. You should discuss your prenuptial agreement well in advance, and each party should have their own attorney.

Should You Have Separate Wills?

Rather than a joint will, it is wise for you and your future spouse to draft separate wills. This can reduce the potential for conflict over property distribution in the future.

Update Existing Estate Plans.

It is important to update your estate plan when you get married, whether you’re marrying late in life or not. Doing so helps ensure your assets will be distributed according to your wishes when you pass away. You’ll want to review your powers of attorney, of course, and pay particular attention to your beneficiary designations on all legal and financial documents. If your ex-spouse is still named as beneficiary on, say, your life insurance policy or retirement plan, the ex could inherit these assets rather than your current spouse.

Protect Income Streams.

Marriage can impact your income from Social Security, Medicaid, the Veterans Administration, alimony, and more. If you have a dependent loved one with special needs, his or her eligibility for public benefits could be impacted as well.

Don’t Ignore the Possibility of Needing Expensive Long-Term Care.

Most of us will require some form of long-term care after age 65. For couples marrying later in life, the obvious question is who will pay for it. If you and your future spouse are creating a prenuptial agreement, you may want to include language requiring each of you to purchase long-term care insurance (assuming such policies are affordable in your case). With the annual cost of a private room in a nursing home averaging over $105,000 in the United States, you can’t afford to ignore the possibility that one or both of you will eventually need long-term care.

Contact a New York Estate Planning Attorney

An experienced estate planning attorney can help you to assess your unique needs and goals. Contact Amoruso & Amoruso, LLP for a personal meeting.

guardian

8 Factors to Consider When Choosing a Guardian for Your Children.

guardian

Who should raise your children if for some reason you or your spouse is unable to do so? It’s not an easy question to answer, but if you have young children, it is a topic you most certainly should address in your estate plan. Otherwise, a court will decide, and their decision will probably not be the same as the one you would have made, and may not even be in the best interests of your children.

Some of the most important issues to consider when choosing a guardian include:

  1. Does the prospective guardian have a genuine interest in your children’s well-being?
  2. Does the prospective guardian share your values?
  3. Can he or she handle the role physically and emotionally? What about financially, if you cannot provide him or her with enough assets to raise your children?
  4. Does the prospective guardian already have children of his or her own? Will he or she be able to make enough time to adequately care for and look after your children?
  5. Where does the prospective guardian live? Would that be a good fit for your children? Would having to move far away make an already stressful situation for your children even more so?
  6. Is it essential that all your children share the same guardian? Most parents say yes, but in some circumstances, such as when your children are of significantly different ages, naming more than one guardian is an option.
  7. Should you choose one person to act as personal guardian and another to manage the financial arrangements for your children—that is, name a second person to act as Custodian or Trustee? In certain situations, such as when the best surrogate parent for your children is not necessarily the best person to handle financial matters, this option is worth considering.
  8. Perhaps most important of all, have you spoken to the prospective guardian about taking on such a responsibility, and does he or she seem readily willing to do so?

Contact an Experienced Guardianship Attorney

We have helped many couples select the ideal guardian for their children and designed wills or other planning documents to ensure their wishes are carried out. We welcome the opportunity to do the same for you.

Living trust concept: a young family preparing breakfast in the kitchen

Make Sure Your Revocable Living Trust Is Properly Funded

You’ve taken the time to plan for the financial well-being of your loved ones and yourself. You’ve created a customized estate plan to address your goals and concerns. Your plan includes one of the most powerful estate planning tools out there, the Revocable Living Trust, which allows your heirs to avoid probate upon your death and provide for management of your assets without interference from the court should you become disabled or otherwise incapacitated.

Living trust concept: a young family preparing breakfast in the kitchen

Properly Funding Your Living Trust

All is well and good—unless you have not taken the steps necessary to fund your trust. Without proper funding, your trust is worth no more than the paper it is written on.

It’s hard to believe, but many families take the time to create a comprehensive estate plan, together with a Revocable Living Trust, then fail to properly fund the trust. And even though a Will may provide that all assets pour over into your trust for further disposition, this takes place only after said assets pass through probate, thereby negating one of the primary benefits of creating the trust in the first place.

Another important factor to consider is that assets such as life insurance, individual retirement accounts and pension plans pass to designated beneficiaries. If the trust is not named as the beneficiary of such assets, they will not be held (and protected) by the trust. Likewise, assets held in joint tenancy with rights of survivorship will go to the surviving joint tenant, not the trust. In addition, assets held in your name alone will not go to the trust until probate has been completed, which can take several months, a year, and sometimes even longer.

Given all of this, it is extremely important for you to review all of your assets to determine which titles should be changed to your trust. Assets you will want to review, and possibly title to your trust, include all of the following:

  • Bank accounts
  • Certificates of deposit
  • Investment accounts
  • Retirement accounts
  • Stocks and bonds held in certificate form
  • Real property
  • Tangible personal property such as art, rugs, jewelry, vehicles, etc.
  • Promissory notes
  • Closely-held business interests

Contact an Experienced New York Estate Planning Attorney

We can counsel you on the best strategies to employ so that your assets are correctly titled and your trust properly funded to achieve your goals and ensure your wishes are carried out.

long term insurance

With Premiums Rising Dramatically, Should You Keep Your Long-Term Care Insurance?

long term insurance

When clients ask us whether it is right for them, we consider their overall plan and unique situation. Sometimes we recommend long-term care insurance, sometimes we don’t, depending on the client’s needs and goals.

But what if you’ve already purchased long-term care insurance, and you’ve seen your premiums rise dramatically in recent years? First of all, you’re not alone. In some cases, premiums have gone up as much as 40 to 60 percent in recent years. The reason is that many insurance companies have suffered major losses on policies written more than ten years ago, and they are looking to recoup those losses. (A number of companies no longer offer long-term care insurance at all.)

If your premiums have increased, should you keep the policy? Make changes to it? Look for a cheaper one? Here are some factors to consider:

  • If your policy is more than two years old, you probably will not be able to find a cheaper one to replace it if you choose to cancel the existing policy. It may also be harder to qualify for a new policy
  • If your premiums have risen more than 20%, you may want to reduce your daily benefit to try and keep the premium down
  • You might be able to reduce your premium by lowering the rate of inflation protection. However, make sure it is not applied retroactively

Contact a New York Elder Law Attorney

Given that every family is unique, with particular needs and goals, it is advisable to discuss matters such as long-term care insurance with an experienced elder law attorney. We can review your policy and your existing plan to determine whether it is in your best interests to keep your existing policy. We can also recommend other tools and strategies that can help ensure you get the long-term care you need without losing your life savings. Contact us today for a consultation.